How Does A ‘Common Citizen’ Know If They Can Be Target Of NDAA?

Pentagon SC 300x189 How Does a ‘Common Citizen’ Know If They Can Be Target of NDAA?

At the start of the first hearing on a lawsuit challenging the Homeland Battlefield Act, a federal judge appeared to be “extremely skeptical” that those pursuing the challenge had grounds to sue the US government. However, by the end of the hearing, the judge acknowledged plaintiffs had made some strong arguments on why there was reason to be concerned about the Act, which passed as part of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) on New Year’s Eve last year.

Adam Klasfeld of Courthouse News, one of the few media organizations that actually covered the hearing yesterday, reported that Judge Katherine B. Forrest cited the lack of definition of terms such as “substantial support” or “associated forces,” which appear in the law. Without clearly knowing what “substantial support” for terrorism or “associated forces” of terrorist groups could be, Forrest asked, “How does the common citizen know?”

The government lawyers contended that the Homeland Battlefield Law “affirms” the Authorization to Use Military Force passed under President George W. Bush. But, according to Klasfeld, Forrest asked why language had changed. “Congress writes legislation for a reason, right?” There must be a purpose for the change.

There are seven plaintiffs trying to sue right now. Dubbed the “Freedom Seven” by their attorneys, the plaintiffs include: Chris Hedges, a journalist; Daniel Ellsberg, who is known for releasing the Pentagon Papers; Noam Chomsky, a well-known writer; Icelandic MP Birgitta Jonsdottir; Tangerine Bolen, founder of RevolutionTruth.org; Kai Wargalla, deputy director of Revolution Truth and founder of Occupy London; and Alexa O’Brien, journalist and founder of US Day of Rage.

Paul Harris of The Guardian also covered the hearing. His report indicates that the government did not block Icelandic MP Birgitta Jonsdottir’s testimony from being entered into the record.

Read More at The Dissenter

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4 comments to How Does A ‘Common Citizen’ Know If They Can Be Target Of NDAA?

  • THIS IS AN OBAMA/HITLER CONSPIRACY TO TAKE CONTROLLER AND THREATEN 1ST AMENDMENT RIGHTS OF DECENTERS—- WE CAN ALL SEE THOUGH THIS COMMUNIST GOD FIGURE MAD MANS PLOT — HE INTENDS TO DESTROY AMERICA— AND BOY CAN HE LIE & LIE & LIE AMERICA IS NOW TURNING AGAINST THIS LYING SOVIET TYRANT — JUST AS THEY TURNED AGAINST HITLER IN HIS LAST DAYS. HE'S R-O-T-T-E-N

    7 LE……..

    • Red 5

      Funny thing is, these are all leftwing idiots. I hope Chompsk gets it first. The commies are now into perging all the useful idiots phase. A tipcal commie textbook play.
      "Hey Noam! Go long and left! Keep going! Keep going and I'll throw ou the ball"! Yep! Into the cage we go……who's next?
      Just sometimes comes in strange ways.

  • DukeChesnut

    The title of this article is left unanswered,"How does the 'Common Citizen' know if they are a target of the NDAA? It is not simple, but implied; If you disagree with Obama and his minions, you can be declared an 'Enemy of the State' and detained indefinitely without trial. This Patriot Act was started under Bush, and expanded under Obama, and the Ruination of our Republic, the Constitution and ALL our freedoms if it is not overturned.

  • Virginia Perkins

    IF you don't agree with Obama and his thugs then they declare you a enemy of the stste. Is that why Fima has started all those Fima Camps?

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