N.M. Judge OKs Doctor-Assisted Suicides





Photo credit: jimmywayne (Creative Commons)

While the radical left pleads for looser restrictions on the barbaric practice, traditional Americans continue to mourn the millions of lives lost to abortion over the past four decades. The murderous procedure, many contend, is evidence of this nation’s disregard for human life.

That argument received additional fortification this week when a New Mexico judge ruled that doctors can now legally take part in a patient’s death, provided he or she expresses a desire to die.

According to the ruling by Second Judicial Judge Nan Nash, terminally ill individuals with a sound mind can now petition their respective doctors for medication that will facilitate their demise.

She based the ruling on an interpretation of the state’s constitution, which protects the citizen’s rights but does not specifically address the issue at hand.

“This court cannot envision a right more fundamental, more private or more integral to the liberty, safety and happiness of a New Mexican than the right of a competent, terminally ill patient to choose aid in dying,” she wrote in her decision.

While her state already has a law prohibiting physician-assisted suicide, a felony, Nash ruled a doctor accelerating a patient’s death does not qualify.

The ruling was in response to action taken by a number of plaintiffs – both physicians and ill patients – who wanted to legally protect doctors who help kill their patients. While the state chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union and other left-leaning organizations herald the decision as a progressive advancement, many who believe in the sanctity of life are incensed.

In a statement, New Mexico ACLU spokesperson Laura Schauer asserted that residents of the state “now enjoy the comfort and peace of mind that come with knowing they can prevent a prolonged, agonized dying process at the end of life.”

New Mexico is now the fifth state to allow such facilitation. Faith leaders, including members of the New Mexico Conference of Catholic Bishops, expressed their disappointment in Nash’s ruling.

Executive Director Allen Sanchez explained that the “chance for human error” should preclude any doctor from making such a life-and-death decision. “If we are not willing to give that ability to a judge and jury by doing away with the death penalty in New Mexico,” he said, “we should not be willing to give one doctor and two witnesses that ability.”

Historically, as societies lurch to the left, a telltale peripheral effect is the cultural devaluation of life. This is seen in policies around the world today and, increasingly, within our own borders.

–B. Christopher Agee

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Photo credit: jimmywayne (Creative Commons)





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2 comments to N.M. Judge OKs Doctor-Assisted Suicides

  • stevor

    can we get o’bama and his doctor to New Mexico?

  • Milton Schick

    I am a Conservative and a Libertarian. But you are dead wrong concerning the rights of a terminally ill patient to want to die to end the suffering. You need to walk in the shoes of someone who has been there and done that. My first wife suffered 3 strokes, spent 258 days in medical facilities, and was at home with me taking care of her for the last 9 months of life. She died in my arms in our bed at 1035 hours 11 June 2005. She had begged to die long before that to end her suffering, but of course the “good” people wouldn’t let her do that. My second wife died form the complications of terminal Alzheimer’s at 0900 hours 11 November 2013, also in my arms in our bed at home. She also wanted to die to end her suffering when she had lucid, rational moments. She knew exactly what was happening to her mind. She was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in January 2011. If someone has the guts to tell me my 2 wives had no right to ask to die to end their misery, then I pity their soul.

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