Justice? Special Ed Student Life Ruined Because He Stood Up To Bullies

Our society has become increasingly interested in curtailing instances of verbal and physical abuse within schools. Simultaneously, however, the rights of individuals have been attacked by an authoritative government and activist judicial system.

Unfortunately, when these two trends collide, the effort to subvert bullying comes up short.

As a case in point, a developmentally disabled high school student in Pennsylvania recently decided to fight back after facing prolonged torment at the hands of his classmates. The 15-year-old was reportedly shoved, tripped, and otherwise targeted by bullies and, at one point, attacked by a student with a cigarette lighter.

In response, the boy decided to gain evidence against his abusers by surreptitiously recording their actions. When his mother discovered what her son had been exposed to at school, she immediately confronted administrators with the recording.

While most rational parents would assume this would lead to swift disciplinary action against the bullies, the teenaged victim was punished instead. Outrageously, he was threatened with a felony wiretapping charge. The boy was subsequently tried and convicted of disorderly conduct.

Quite the contrary, the majority of similar cases have resulted in financial windfalls for the victimized students’ families and decisive action against bullies and school staffers.

During his testimony, he claimed his only intention in recording the other students was to prove the abuse was actually occurring.

“I was really having things like books slammed upside my head,” he explained, saying he “felt like nothing was being done.”

Unbelievably, reports indicate the recording was erased by school officials, though the victim’s mother was able to recount much of the disturbing and profane dialogue in court. Since Pennsylvania requires universal consent to record conversations, however, the content of the recording was deemed inconsequential. Therefore, even with concrete evidence that the students were engaged in the harassing behavior, none received any punishment.

The teen is not accepting his conviction without a fight, though. He is set to appeal the court’s ruling later this month.

Photo Credit: Facebook/The BULLY Project

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom

Do you have $25,000 in your IRA or 401(k)? This "Loophole" in IRS Code lets you move your savings to gold ... get this NO-COST Info Guide >

2 comments to Justice? Special Ed Student Life Ruined Because He Stood Up To Bullies

  • wildbill446

    Well so much for supervising school officials. Weren’t we taught when we were very young to report things like this to school officials?. I guess that’s a thing of the past. Now it’s every man for themselves.

  • Elaine

    I am NOT defending murder, okay?
    Do you remember Columbine? The Young men who took matters into their own hands. They blamed it all on “guns; and a movie”.

    Columbine was/is a very wealthy area. The boys who were abused on a daily basis were not from families who were wealthy. They were middle income just like many of us grew up in. They were emotionally and physically abused everyday.

    The parents did the right thing after the children reported to them what was going on. They went to the principal. What was done? NOTHING.
    They went to the Police Dept. What was done? NOTHING.
    They were humiliated so much…and at the time in their lives when hormones were rising to be men.

    NO ONE would intervene for them. Unfortunately, they took matters into their own hands.
    ———-
    There are other stories of young ladies who have committed suicide for being abused at school. They did report it; and were also ignored.

    We have cruel society. I know what the answer are…no one wants to deal with it for some reason. You’ll have to explain to me why these children are ignored. Why they allow kids to bully others?

Leave a Reply

  

  

  

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>